The brain, learning, and teaching: Can a better understanding of the brain help us teach better?

Masson, S. (2014). The brain, learning, and teaching: Can a better understanding of the brain help us teach better? Education Canada, 54(4), 48-51. 


ABSTRACT

In recent years, three major discoveries have reinforced the relevance of neuroscience research in education. The first is that learning changes the architecture of the brain. It is therefore possible to use brain imaging to identify brain changes associated with school learning. The second is that the architecture of the brain influences learning. Consequently, a better knowledge of students’ brain architecture could help us understand the biological constraints related to their learning. The third discovery is that teaching influences the effects of learning on the brain. Thus, two types of teaching may have different effects on the development of students’ brains. These three findings support the idea that better knowledge of students’ brains can provide clues to help us teach better.

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